Common core critical thinking activities

In place will be a new world of education where all American children are exposed to the same content, delivered by highly standardized teachers, watched over by their equally standardized principals, and monitored by governments armed with sophisticated data tools. This is the last year to ensure that happens: As American schools pour their resources into products, programs, and services to be Common Core ready inplease keep in mind that the Common Core is a bet on the future of our children.

Common core critical thinking activities

Hot links Critical thinking is the process of actively analyzing, evaluating, and synthesizing information gathered from a variety of sources, using a framework designed to lend structure and clarity to the thinking process.

As children think, they use their background knowledge, as well as information gathered from other sources, to draw their own conclusions. One of the challenges when teaching critical thinking skills to English language learners ELLs is helping them develop adequate background knowledge and adequate vocabulary to support this type of higher order thinking.

How can educators teach critical thinking skills? The article Hooked on Thinking by Ann Paziotopoulos and Marianne Kroll, describes critical thinking using a skyscraper analogy. Using a construct based on Bloom's Taxonomy, the authors compare the different layers of critical thinking see chart below to the different levels of a building.

The foundation of the building, or the lowest level of critical thinking, would be represented by such tasks as recalling facts from a story. At the second level, students might be expected to give a summary or an explanation of a story. At the third level, students would be expected to relate the story to their own lives.

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At the fourth level, they would compare and contrast elements within the story. The fifth level would require hypothesizing or creating something new based on the reading. To reach the top of the skyscraper, or the sixth level, students must be able to synthesize the information from the story and then formulate their own opinions.

An important element of higher order thinking is learning to ask critical questions. ELLs in particular need assistance in learning how to ask these types of questions that will enhance their understanding i. What would have happened to her? Teachers can begin this process by pre-teaching vocabulary and helping students build background knowledge prior to reading.

Suggested Activities Lower Grade Activities In lower grades, the teacher should present this lesson as a whole group activity. Ensure ELLs receive a list of any challenging vocabulary words they might encounter. It's a good idea to provide an explanation and the meaning for each word before they begin to read the story.

Common core critical thinking activities

Begin to model higher thinking skillsby evaluating your student's different levels of knowledge. Upper Grade Activities Teachers may choose to first model the first paragraph and then let students work in small groups as they find the main idea.

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Have students read a story and write several questions for each level adapting Bloom's Taxonomy for use with literature. Have students work in groups to answer the questions they have created.

Hot links This site offers an introduction to different stages of Bloom's Taxonomy theory, as well as methods for applying the theory in lesson plans.Dartmouth Writing Program support materials - including development of argument.

Fundamentals of Critical Reading and Effective Writing. Mind Mirror Projects: A Tool for Integrating Critical Thinking into the English Language Classroom (), by Tully, in English Teaching Forum, State Department, Number 1 Critical Thinking Across the . Critical Thinking in Schools LEARNING Critical Thinking (outside school) — Educating Yourself.

You can use online tutorials of Critical Thinking Web about Logic, Fallacy, Argument Analysis, Venn Diagrams, Scientific Reasoning, and much more.{ This website was developed – by Joe Lau & Jonathan Chan – for college students and teachers, .

Introduce 9 Traits of Critical Thinking(TM) across the curriculum with ThinkUp!, a line of resources for principals, teachers, and students that supports a school-wide culture of thinking and learning. Overview of the Common Core. The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) are an effort by states to define a common core of knowledge and skills that students should develop in K–12 education so they will graduate from high school prepared for college or careers.

Sep 17,  · Learn more about the Common Core State Standards and how they will shift English Language Arts teaching and learning, and discover links to classroom and professional development resources for K–3 teachers.

This lesson plan gives three detailed pages of directions including photographs to show how the lesson unfolds. The objective of the lesson is to help intermediate students begin to tackle more challenging reading material and to process it at a deeper level.

Creativity, Thinking Skills, Critical Thinking, Problem solving, Decision making, innovation